12/27/2010

THE "SHAFTS OF LIGHT" OVER OSLOW, NORWAY

First of all: this could possibly be huge.

Secondly, hi everybody! Something odd happened today/yesterday, as what I would define as strings of light appeared over a city in Norway. The authority automatically dismissed any abnormal causes, saying it's a weather phenomenon. So here's the link to an article talking about this: Lights Over Norway (if someone can translate this that'd be appreciated)

Ok, so here's the interesting part! As odd as they look like, they were actually predicted! I know most of you aren't big fans of channeled material, but hey!

So read this channeling with the Blossom Goodchild (whoever it may be, hoax or not, he talked about this 3 days ago): Blossom Goodchild

Here are the pictures:
Read more about Wiley Brooks:   http://breatharian.com/wileysblog.html


I was told, along this picture of the sky over Oslo. Remember what Blossom’s soruce, the Galactic Federation, said about shafts of light appearing in the sky?
There is a physical explanation for the phenomenon over Oslo. A ski slope’s ice cannons were left on over night. I accept that explanation, but the sight is very apt even if ice cannons were the source.  Perhaps a suggestion of what we may expect in the future.



Here is one of the ice cannons thought to have created the weather conditions:


Norway Shafts of Light

Click on Pics to see:  Big Pics
Disse pilarene ble sett i desember i fjor.




Foto: Mikael Kristiansen


Many people have seen light pillars. They appear during winter when city lights shine upward into the icy air. Reflections from plate-shaped crystals spread the light into a vertical column: examples.
Truhin's pillars, however, are not the ordinary kind. Even two leading experts in atmospheric optics can't quite figure them out: "These pillars are mysterious," say Les Cowley and Marko Riikonen. "They have unexplained curved tops and even curved arcs coming from their base. Arcs in rare displays like these could be from column crystals to give parts of tangent arcs, others could be the enigmatic Moilanan arc or even the recently discovered reflected Parry arc. We do not know – so take more photos on cold nights!"

Scientists at the website spaceweather.com said: ‘Truhin’s pillars are not the ordinary kind. Even eading experts in atmospheric optics can’t quite figure them out



15th January 2009
These stunning images show mysterious columns of light streaming into the sky above the town of Sigulda in Latvia at the end of last month.
Taken by designer Aigar Truhins with a standard digital camera, the photographs have prompted excited online discussions among amateur astronomists all over the internet.
'My son exclaimed, 'The aliens are coming!'' Truhins was quoted as saying.
Enlarge   Beam me up: Mysterious columns of light stream into the air above the town of Sigulda
Beam me up: Mysterious columns of light stream into the air above the town of Sigulda

The mysterious lights prompted excited discussion on the internet
The mysterious lights prompted excited discussion on the internet
'It certainly looked that way,' he added.
But experts are agreed there may be a more prosaic explanation - ice crystals in the air.
The air above the town was notably cold and filled with suspended ice crystals.
 It is believed that the columns were formed by those reflecting light from the bright streetlamps and other lights on the ground - beaming it back downwards again.
Skies all over Europe have been filled with such natural phenomena during the cold snap of recent weeks.
But finally the experts agreed on one explanation...
But finally the experts agreed on one explanation...

The lights were said to be a reflection caused by the light from streetlamps on the ground hitting ice crystals suspended in the cold air
The lights were said to be a reflection caused by the light from streetlamps on the ground hitting ice crystals suspended in the cold air
Scientists at the website spaceweather.com said: 'Truhin’s pillars are not the ordinary kind. Even eading experts in atmospheric optics can’t quite figure them out
'These pillars are mysterious. They have unexplained curved tops and even curved arcs coming from their base.
'Arcs in rare displays like these could be from column crystals to give parts of tangent arcs, others could be the enigmatic Moilanan arc or even the recently discovered reflected Parry arc.
'We do not know – so take more photos on cold nights!'
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1117264/Beam-Scientists-left-baffled-mysterious-columns-coloured-light-appear-night-skies.html#ixzz191taUdSH

Columns of light apparently beaming directly upwards from unshielded (and wastefully polluting) lights are sometimes visible during very cold weather. Plate shaped ice crystals, normally only present in high clouds, float in the air close to the ground and their horizontal facets reflect light back downwards.

The pillars are not physically over the lights or anywhere else in space for that matter ~ like all halos they are purely the collected light beams from all the millions of crystals which just happen to be reflecting light towards your eyes or camera. Artificial light pillars can be much taller than their natural counterparts because rays from the lights are not parallel and plate crystals with small tilts can still reflect them downwards. The crystals producing the pillars are roughly halfway between you and the lights.

When ice crystals float in the air around you, pillars (and other halos) can even be seen around streetlights a few metres away.






oh, Maarten, that schematic figure that shows how the crystals break the light and how we see the line of light
that makes me remember that rainbows are made in a similar way (but than the ice crystals are replaced with water droplets)

one rainbow-explanation:
You can't see rainbows at all times of the day. To understand why, visualize the way the rainbow works.

If you stand with your back to the sun while looking at a rainbow, imagine a line from the sun passing through your eye, through the Earth, and out into space. (This is called the antisolar point). The rainbow forms a complete circle around this imaginary line, however from ground level part of it is always below the horizon. A line drawn from your eye to the top of the rainbow forms a 42-degree angle with the imaginary line from the sun through your eye. (If there is a secondary rainbow, it forms an angle of 51-degrees). Because these angles determine the position of the rainbow in the sky, it will sink as the sun rises and rise as the sun sinks. At some points, the entire rainbow, not just the bottom half, will be below the horizon where you can't see it. That's why you'll never see a summer rainbow at midday.

another rainbow-explanation:
    When white sunlight hits a collection of raindrops at a fairly low angle, you can see the component colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet - a rainbow. For simplicity's sake, we'll only look at red and violet, the colors of light on the ends of the visible light spectrum.
    The diagram below shows what happens when the sunlight hits one individual raindrop.



    When the white light passes from air into the drop of water, the component colors of light slow down to different speeds depending on their frequency. The violet light bends at a relatively sharp angle when it enters the raindrop. At the right-hand side of the drop, some of the light passes back out into the air, and the rest is reflected backward. Some of the reflected light passes out of the left side of the drop, bending as it moves into the air again.
    In this way, each individual raindrop disperses white sunlight into its component colors. So why do we see wide bands of color, as if different rainy areas were dispersing a different single color? Because we only see one color from each raindrop. You can see how this works in the diagram below.


When raindrop A disperses light, only the red light exits at the correct angle to travel to the observer's eyes. The other colored beams exit at a lower angle, so the observer doesn't see them. The sunlight will hit all the surrounding raindrops in the same way, so they will all bounce red light onto the observer.
    Raindrop B is much lower in the sky, so it doesn't bounce red light to the observer. At its height, the violet light exits at the correct angle to travel to the observer's eye. All the drops surrounding raindrop B bounce light in the same way. The raindrops in between A and B all bounce different colors of light to the observer, so the observer sees the full color spectrum. If you were up above the rain, you would see the rainbow as a full circle, because the light would bounce back from all around you. On the ground, we see the arc of the rainbow that is visible above the horizon.
    Sometimes you see a double rainbow - a sharp rainbow with a fainter rainbow on top of it. The fainter rainbow is produced in the same way as the sharper rainbow, but instead of the light reflecting once inside the raindrop, it's reflected twice. As a result of this double reflection, the light exits the raindrop at a different angle, so we see it higher up. If you look carefully, you'll see that the colors in the second rainbow are in the reverse order of the primary rainbow.
    And that's really all there is to rainbows. Light and water happen to combine in just the right way to paint a beautiful natural picture.


hmm, ok,... so now I started thinking further about this 'ice crystal theory' --- if the ice crystals work like the water drops (without the coloured prisma-effect ^^), than why do we see a 'straight column' instead of 'a piece of a perfect circle' ??? (I hope someone is smart enought to explain me in a better way, otherwise I am getting too smart to be fooled with a silly theory??)



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